There are several quite straightforward defences to an alleged speeding offence. Here are some of the more common defences.

Defence 1. I was not the driver of the vehicle
If you were not driving the vehicle at the time of the alleged speeding offence then you have a valid defence to a speeding prosecution. If you were the registered keeper then you are required by law to return the Notice of Intended Prosecution form with details of who was driving. If you fail to return the form then you will receive six penalty points on your licence (more than the penalty for the speeding offence itself). On receipt of the form the authorities will contact the driver who will then be prosecuted.

Defence 2. I don’t know who was driving
If you genuinely don’t know who was driving then this may be a valid defence. You are however required to make every effort to discover who the driver was. This may involve checking fuel receipts, phone records etc of those people who could have been driving.

Defence 3. It’s a company vehicle and I don’t know who was driving
You are required to make every effort (“reasonable diligence”) to find out who was driving at the time of the alleged speeding offence. An employer is expected to check the licences of those people who they allow to drive their vehicles and it is expected that they will keep a record of who is using a vehicle at a particular time.

Defence 4. I ¬†wasn’t exceeding the speed¬†the limit
Ask to see the police photos/video from the speed camera equipment. It is possible that a mistake has been made. The equipment may not be correctly calibrated or the number plate may have been misread.

Defence 5. My partner and I shared the driving and we don’t know who was driving at the time
This defence was successfully used by celebrities Neil & Christine Hamilton. Again you must make every effort to find out who was driving at the time of the speeding offence.